Screen anomalies with RMS amplitude

For a faster way of screening anomalies to confidently interpret your geology, GeoTeric incorporates RMS amplitude calculations in the iso-proportional slicing tool and also allows the creation of a volumetric RMS cube using processes and workflows.  Learn more and follow our step by step guide to c...

Ryan Williams

Recent Posts

Transition of rock properties in Validat...

Within GeoTerics’ Validate module it is possible to define rock properties from well logs to generat...

Steering Your Analysis in the Right Dire...

Dip and Azimuth volumes are used in several ways in GeoTeric, from processes such as Noise Cancellat...

GeoTeric 2017.2 – Floating Point Data

The GeoTeric 2017.2 release not only included the release of the Adaptive Faults as part of our Adap...

GeoTeric’s Adaptive Fault Interpretation

GeoTeric’s Adaptive Fault Interpretation provides a fast and accurate interpretation system which im...

Adaptive Geobodies Part 2 – High Definit...

In the previous Geobodies instalment, a geobody was created using a Standard Frequency Decomposition...

Adaptive Geobodies Part 1 – Standard Fre...

The Adaptive Geobodies tool tool is based on generating delineating geological deposits from data va...

Bedform Blends

RGB Frequency Decomposition Blends are extremely useful in identifying both structural and stratigra...

Horizon based geobodies for Gross Rock V...

Not all geobodies are discrete geological features that can be extracted such as channels or debris ...

A different Means of interpreting blends

A common question with regards to RGB colour blends is “what do the colours show me” or “is there a ...

Ryan Williams

Recent Posts

Transition of rock properties in Validate

Posted by Ryan Williams on 17 Oct 2018

Within GeoTerics’ Validate module it is possible to define rock properties from well logs to generate geologically accurate models. Once accurate rock properties are defined in a model, it is important to accurately replicate the geological scenario for which the model is testing. In some cases, using defined rock properties is not enough detail to replicate the geological depositional environment. To increase the accuracy of the model design it is possible to transition rock properties from one type to another.

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Topics: Blog, Validate, Rock Properties, Well Logs, Digital Transformation, RGB

Steering Your Analysis in the Right Direction

Posted by Ryan Williams on 26 Feb 2018

Dip and Azimuth volumes are used in several ways in GeoTeric, from processes such as Noise Cancellation (SO FMH & SO Noise filters) to attribute generation (SO Semblance, SO Dip Derivative, SO Discontinuity, Flexure, etc...). The majority of these filters/attributes have the symbol SO in front of them, indicating they are Structurally Oriented.

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Topics: Blog, noise cancellation, Dip, Azimuth

GeoTeric 2017.2 – Floating Point Data

Posted by Ryan Williams on 19 Oct 2017

The GeoTeric 2017.2 release not only included the release of the Adaptive Faults as part of our Adaptive Interpretation System, but also the ability to load and visualise data in floating point.  The ability to load geophysical volumes such as Vp/Vs and Acoustic Impedance volumes with their original values allows interpreters to extend their subsurface analysis capabilities in GeoTeric.  

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Topics: Blog, Floating Points, Adaptive Faults

GeoTeric’s Adaptive Fault Interpretation

Posted by Ryan Williams on 12 Oct 2017

GeoTeric’s Adaptive Fault Interpretation provides a fast and accurate interpretation system which improves the efficiency of your fault interpretation.

The Adaptive Faults are data following fault sticks, which snap to discontinuities in reflectivity data, attributes or CMY Blends.  With just 2 clicks of the mouse you can have an accurate fault stick.   The Graph Theory looks at how similar the attribute, or break in the seismic data is from the background and determines the best route from first click to where the cursor is located. 

To start interpreting the faults, click on the Interpret module (figure 1) or right click in the 3D scene and select Adaptive Faults.  Either option will bring up the main Interpretation menu in the 3D scene.

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Topics: Blog, Adaptive Faults

Adaptive Geobodies Part 2 – High Definition Frequency Decomposition Based

Posted by Ryan Williams on 07 Sep 2017

In the previous Geobodies instalment, a geobody was created using a Standard Frequency Decomposition (FD) blend as this technique is useful in identifying subtle changes within a geological feature. In this post, an Adaptive Geobody will be created using a High Definition Frequency Decomposition (HDFD) blend. The matching pursuit techniques used in GeoTeric’s HDFD blending generates frequency decomposition results as close to seismic resolution as possible. This improvement in vertical/temporal resolution is traded off in terms of accuracy of frequency resolution.

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Topics: Blog, Adaptive Geobodies, Frequency Decomposition, Spectral Decomposition

Adaptive Geobodies Part 1 – Standard Frequency Decomposition Based

Posted by Ryan Williams on 31 Aug 2017

The Adaptive Geobodies tool tool is based on generating delineating geological deposits from data values using model based delineation. It is a powerful and flexible tool which can be used in multiple ways. The basic techniques will be shown below and in this instalment the benefits of using a Standard Frequency Decomposition blends for creating geobodies.

The benefits of the different Blending techniques were outlines in the previous blog posts and here we will look at using the Standard blending method to extract geological features.  The Constant Bandwidth and Uniform/Exponential Constant Q are useful reconnaissance blends as they have very good frequency resolution but poorer temporal resolution. As a result it is possible to identify subtle frequency differences within these blends and subsequently extract them with the Adaptive Geobodies workflow.

 

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Topics: Blog, Adaptive Geobodies, Frequency Decomposition, Spectral Decomposition

Bedform Blends

Posted by Ryan Williams on 25 Nov 2016

RGB Frequency Decomposition Blends are extremely useful in identifying both structural and stratigraphic events. These are best observed in the Z domain as the effects of vertical smearing are minimized.  When observed along the inline or crossline it can be harder to trace the stratigraphic events.

Bedform Indicator is designed to skeletonize the seismic response to highlight the relationship between seismic strata within the data set. It highlights bedform features such as onlaps and clinoforms. So, by combining the Bedform Indicator volume with the RGB volume it will be possible to map and track sratigraphic features in 3D.

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Topics: Bedform Indicator, Frequency Decomposition, Blog

Horizon based geobodies for Gross Rock Volume calculation

Posted by Ryan Williams on 17 Jun 2016

Not all geobodies are discrete geological features that can be extracted such as channels or debris flows, sometime more large scale geobodies need to be calculated. This is often the case when analysing large reservoirs where a “tank of sand” model may be applied or if two horizons pinch-out making geobody volumetric estimations difficult. This is an important process as the Gross Rock Volume (GRV) is an essential input to the STOIIP or GIIP calculations.  We can increase the accuracy of our GRV estimation with the use of existing horizons and the Adaptive Geobody tool.

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Topics: Geobody, horizon, Volumetrics, Blog

A different Means of interpreting blends

Posted by Ryan Williams on 15 Jan 2016
A common question with regards to RGB colour blends is “what do the colours show me” or “is there a way to show other areas with this response”. In this post we will look at how using the Mean frequency can be used to address these questions.
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Topics: Frequency Decomposition, Mean, Blog