Screen anomalies with RMS amplitude

For a faster way of screening anomalies to confidently interpret your geology, GeoTeric incorporates RMS amplitude calculations in the iso-proportional slicing tool and also allows the creation of a volumetric RMS cube using processes and workflows.  Learn more and follow our step by step guide to c...

Validate Part 1: Creating a Simple Forwa...

This will be a two-part blog post focusing on ‘Validate’, GeoTeric’s Seismic Forward Modelling modul...

How to optimise frequencies in a RGB col...

RGB Blends of Frequency Decomposition results are very powerful in revealing fine details of the sub...

GeoTeric 2017 Adaptive Horizons: Part 3 ...

GeoTeric’s Adaptive Horizons tool allows the user to intuitively and interactively edit a tracked su...

Validate Part 1: Creating a Simple Forward Model to Test Depositional Scenarios

Posted by Andrew Pomroy on 13 Jul 2018

This will be a two-part blog post focusing on ‘Validate’, GeoTeric’s Seismic Forward Modelling module that recently became available with the release of 2018.1. The tool is intended for interpreters to be able to easily test hypotheses by creating models that can be matched back to frequency decomposition results as well as reflectivity data.
This week’s post works through a simple example of testing a hypothesis using Validate. In the next post, we will go over some more advanced topics.

We begin by focusing on the Eskdale reservoir in offshore Australia’s Exmouth Basin. This field is comprised of deepwater channel sands compartmentalized by faults. We’ll be looking at the first exploration well, Eskdale-1 (Fig. 1), which found only residual oil in a 75-meter-thick sand package.

Figure 1: Gamma Ray and acoustic logs over the Eskdale reservoir in the Eskdale-1 well. Note the change in acoustic impedance at the “Intra_reservoir” marker.

Figure 2 shows a map view of the frequency decomposition RGB colour blend draped 10ms below the top of the Eskdale member. The Eskdale-2 well was drilled in a separate fault block and found economic oil, so the task of defining the reservoir extents both in terms of reservoir quality sand and fluid content becomes critical if the field is to continue to be appraised and developed. As evidenced by the map below, GeoTeric’s Frequency Decomposition attributes reveal many aspects of the depositional system. But the question has always been, “what do the colours mean?”. Validate can help answer that question.

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Topics: Blog, Validate, Forward Modelling, Frequency Decomposition, RGB Blend, GeoTeric 2018.1

How to optimise frequencies in a RGB colour blend

Posted by Peter Szafian on 29 Jan 2018

RGB Blends of Frequency Decomposition results are very powerful in revealing fine details of the subsurface, but the amount of information that can be extracted from such blends depends on which band-limited response magnitude volumes are used as an input. Selection of the right frequencies depends on the interval, amount of detail and objective of the analysis.

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Topics: Blog, High Definition Frequency Decomposition, Frequency Decomposition, RGB Blend

GeoTeric 2017 Adaptive Horizons: Part 3 – 3D Editing

Posted by Abdul Cader on 28 Jul 2017

GeoTeric’s Adaptive Horizons tool allows the user to intuitively and interactively edit a tracked surface or interpretation. This is done by identifying the mis-pick in the interpretation, selecting the “3D edit” icon, and re-interpreting the line (we recommend using Piecewise Tracking). This will then update the tracked surface in the surrounding area. The tick-box enables “3D Edit Override”, so any interpreted lines will be removed or overwritten. This is useful when the interpreted lines have been incorrectly positioned by the user.

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Topics: Blog, RGB Blend, Adaptive Horizons, High Definition Frequency Decomposition